Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Books to read in the bathtub



The bathtub has always been a favourite spot of mine to take a book, for excellent reasons. It's one of the few places I'm sure I won't be interrupted in the middle of a good story. We're forcing ourselves to be a captive audience for the time we've put aside. It's a bit sad that we need to use the word 'force' in a sentence about having fun times, but sometimes that's what it takes. Add some bubble bath, essential oils, a warm drink and perhaps a snack, and you're all set. And make sure you lock the door.

I thought I'd base this list of suggestions on one criteria. They all involve characters having baths, or at least washing. A very cool fact jumped out at me. There is more depth to bathtub stories than mere relaxation. (No, I won't apologise for that pun.) I noticed a cleansing theme. Sometimes, people are washing away more than just surface grime. The author is also making statements about the state of their hearts and attitudes. And there's a vulnerability aspect, for obvious reasons. Nowhere is a person more his honest self than in the bathtub. And understandably so. If you're not safe and sound in your own bathroom, where can you be? And finally, can you believe taking baths could be a competitive act? Well, sometimes that's the case. Without further ado, here they all are.       

1) Franny and Zooey
 Since a fair chunk of this classic novella takes place from the bathtub, it seems like a good idea to begin the list with it. The young hero Zooey is trying to enjoy a relaxing bath when his mother, Bessie, bursts in, as she's anxious about Franny and wants his help. The conversation goes on and on, and although he snaps at her for invading his privacy, she won't take the hint. At least he has the bath curtain drawn across. Even so, I suspect if I tried to burst in on either of my sons while they were taking a bath, I'd end up soaking wet. My review is here.

I Capture the Castle2) I Capture the Castle
The 17-year-old heroine Cassandra also has her bath interrupted, this time by a sudden visit from handsome neighbours on a dark and stormy night. It's one of those heavy, portable old metal tubs which the family use for multiple purposes, and earlier that day, it had contained green dye. Her luxurious soak is awkwardly cut short, and she ends up with a weird tinge on her skin to greet their guests. Cassandra loves her warm soaks enough to make an excellent observation, 'Noble deeds and hot baths are the best cure for depression.' My review is here.

3) Farmer Boy
Laura Ingalls Wilder gives a detailed description of Almanzo's family taking their Saturday night baths. Everyone uses the same water, from the parents down to the youngest child, who happened to be him. Almanzo wasn't a big fan of the whole process, which included getting his front roasted by the fire while his back was freezing cold. I don't think I would enjoyed baths much in those conditions either.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter, #4)4) Harry Potter 
I would have loved the chance to be a prefect at Hogwarts, just to experience their bathroom. Remember when Cedric Diggory gives Harry a mysterious hint to have a bath, to help him figure out the riddle of the dragon's egg in the Tri-Wizard tournament? The bathroom turns out to have a tub the size of a swimming pool, candlelit chandeliers, marble fixtures, and hundreds of golden taps with different scented bubble bath. That's worth the occasional visit from Moaning Myrtle.

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (Chronicles of Narnia, #3)5) The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
One of the most painful, but necessary baths surely took place in Narnia. Poor Eustace Scrubb has spent weeks in the form of a dragon, after he tried to remove a magical bracelet from their deserted lair. He's desperate to become a boy again, and at last Aslan instructs him to take a bath in which he peels off several layers of his dragon skin, even when Eustace is certain there's no more left. But his former baths turn out to have been quite superficial. This is a healing soak in which he makes a new friend and learns a great lesson.

The Sultan's Bath6) The Sultan's Bath
It's one of the story books from my husband's childhood, based on an old folk tale. The Middle East is in drought conditions, and the sultan claims every drop of precious water for his leisurely bath, but a thief has been stealing it. It turns out to be the palace gardener, who is punished accordingly. But the sultan re-thinks his decision, when his lush garden starts wilting.

7) Bathsheba
She's the beautiful woman in the Old Testament book of 1Samuel, who was taking a cyclical purifying bath on her roof top, after her time of the month. However, there happened to be a witness. It was King David, who wasn't out fighting with his army, for whatever reason. Instantly infatuated with the beautiful woman, he'll stop at nothing to have her all to himself, even when he finds out that she's married to one of his brave soldiers, Uriah. Did Bathsheba come to regret that particular bath? There aren't many details to help us answer that question, so we can only imagine.

Have you been wondering about the baths for competitions I mentioned? Here they are.
The Hunger Games (The Hunger Games, #1)
8) The Hunger Games
As one of the preliminary lead-ups to the games, contestants must all go through extreme cleansing ceremonies in which they're thoroughly washed, shaved and sterilised. Katniss Everdeen, coming as she does from a country region, is thoroughly bemused by the whole thing. I can't blame her. Why do they need to be groomed so thoroughly to be unleashed in the wilderness to kill each other? Of course it's all for the hype and cameras.

9) Queen Esther
She was the humble Hebrew maiden who became Queen of Israel. The former Queen Vashti had refused King Xerxe's demand to come and put herself on display for his guests, so he de-throned her and set out to find a more obedient queen. All the candidates had to spend months having beauty treatments, which included many baths in special perfumes. He sure had tickets on himself, that King Xerxes.


And although the final three don't actually take place in the bathtub, they do involve the action of washing and serve the same purpose.

Great Expectations10) Great Expectations
The hard-nosed lawyer Jaggers has a ritual of his own, just before he steps from his office onto the street. He washes his hands thoroughly with strong perfumed soap, to symbolise that he won't pay any more attention to work-related issues until his return. His followers and clients have learned to feel disappointment when they smell the flowery scent, because they've learned through experience that they'll get nothing out of him but snubs. My review is here.

11) Pontius Pilate
Here's another example of a man who made a symbolic gesture out of washing his hands. He believed in his own heart that the prisoner, Jesus, who stood before him, was innocent of the insurrection the angry mob accused him of. Pilate's wife even had a prophetic dream, and warned her husband to have nothing to do with the innocent man. But he finally gives in to the unrelenting demands of the crowd, and indicates by his action that he's finished with the subject, they can do as they please, and he wants nothing more to do with it.

12) The Last Supper
Jesus is well aware of the power struggles his disciples feel. None of them want to be the guy who stoops low enough to offer the demeaning task of washing the dust off the others' feet, before they share their meal. It's usually a job for a menial or a servant. By seizing the towel and foot bath himself, Jesus demonstrates that he wants his followers to reverse their thinking patterns, and understand that carrying out helpful acts of service on behalf of others is, in fact, a noble thing to do.

So there we are. Makes me feel like grabbing a pile of books and hopping into a steaming hot bath right now. The only two drawbacks I've had in recent years were never an issue in the past. First, you can't take e-readers in there, because steam and condensation may muck up the inner workings. I used to put my old kindle in a sealed sandwich bag, but only a few times because it felt a bit risky. Secondly, I need reading glasses now, and they always fog up a bit to start with, preventing me from seeing the pages. Are you a bathtub reader yourself?   

9 comments:

  1. Love this list, Paula. Baths can be relaxing tough these days I usually take showers. I remember reading in How Green Was My Valley about the weekly bath and sharing the bath water probably because water had to be hauled in from the well. And for the ultimate bath experience - one of the characters in Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy is always taking a bath with his backscubber and rubber duckie. Which reminds me that the Veggie Tales version of David and Bathsheba - Bathsheba was a rubbber duckie. Maybe from the sublime to the ridiculous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jenny,
      Oh yeah, I remember that guy, although I don't remember his name. A re-read of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy may be overdue. It's been a long time. And now I'm humming the Veggie Tales theme, which really takes me back to the nineties :) And now that you mention it, Ernie from Sesame Street had the rubber duckie thing happening too, lol.
      I always try to make time for at least relaxing bath per week. It's one place where we can justify settling down for a while, and not hopping up to do something else. Thanks for your comment and trip down memory lane.

      Delete
  2. I love the thought of reading in the bath but usually the logistics defeat me. Too easy to get the book wet or drop it in the water.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Christine, I know what you mean. I haven't dropped many, but it does happen occasionally, and then I feel bad for ruining a good book 😔

      Delete
  3. Wow. I had forgotten all about the reading in baths... and had not realized how much it is mentioned.
    Nowadays it is only showers for me. But you have me sighing for bygone days. Makes me relax just to think of it.
    Still, I have an old Kindle now, so have an excuse LOL (as well as infirmity.)
    Enjoyable post, thank you

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Susan, I'm not quite as much of a bath reader as I used to be, because of reading glasses and e-books, but still try to make the time 😊

      Delete
  4. LOL Paula, only you would know enough bathtime stories to fill such a list. Some great insights there. I've never been game to read in the bath, though one of my aunt and uncles used to have an extensive array of reading matter in their loo. Well not IN the loo, but you know what I mean. If I ever got bored while visiting there, I'd always just pop into the loo for a read :) The only other bathy story that sprung to mind for me was the story of Naaman in 2 Kings 5 - He had to have seven dips in the Jordan to be healed of leprosy. Thanks for an entertaining read :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Nola,
      Yeah, Naaman! That's a great thought. How could I have overlooked him, since that was such a healing soak. Now I look at them, there are many significant Biblical baths, aren't there? Something to do with the scarcity of good water in the Middle East and vital function of the Jordan maybe.
      As for loo reads, should I take that as a challenge, lol?

      Delete
    2. LOL - I'll look forward to your significant loos of literature post :)

      Delete